FAQ

Frequently asked questions

We have been working hard on finding the cannabis/hemp strains containing high concentrations of CBD, other cannabinoids and untraceable amounts of THC.

CBD oil is derived from cannabis plants that have high levels of cannabidiol (CBD) while having low levels of THC. At Re-New™, our CBD oils always have less than 0.2% THC. These extracts can then be used in paste form, or mixed with other oils such as hemp seed oil, to lower the viscosity of the extract. The cannabidiol (CBD) content of CBD oil varies tremendously, since the manufacturers use a varying assortment of cannabis plants and preparation techniques. At VitalHemp™ we produce CBD oil with a high concentration of CBD and containing 0.2% THC.

Hemp oil is simply another word used for CBD oil, as both are terms to mean cannabis extracts. But be aware that there is also a huge misunderstanding about the difference between hemp seed oil and hemp oil, with many people believing they are the same. Hemp seed oil is derived purely from hemp seeds, and is used in food preparation but does not contain CBD or any other cannabinoids.

At Re-New™ we use solvent free CO2 extraction, in other words using the CO2 from the air we breath to extract the beneficial molecules.

CBD Oil/Hemp Oil and other hemp products are considered to be food-based. As such, there are no restrictions on the production, sale and consumption of hemp oil in the United States and Europe. CBD Oil/Hemp Oil is legal in most countries in the world as long is it contains low or in some countries untraceable concentrations of the molecule THC.

Although we always say that CBD effects everyone differently, the answer is no, hemp oil contains mainly CBD, a compound which does not make the consumer feel high. Instead, hemp oil helps maintain a calmer, clearer mind while also maintaining an active lifestyle.

We cannot make any medical claims about CBD/Hemp Oil. 

It is recommended that you conduct your own research or contact your doctor.

These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA.

All are actually cannabis plants, however hemp or industrial hemp is a term commonly used for cannabis strains that contain very low levels of THC, to be precise below 0.2% THC. Marijuana in general is a word used for plants that contain high amounts of THC.

CBD,Chlorophyll, Alkanes, Nitrogenous compounds, Amino acids, Sugars, Aldehydes, Alcohols, Ketones, Flavonoids, Glycosides, Vitamins and Pigments.

We have found out that cannabis/hemp contains over 400 molecules and in recent research we have discovered there are a group of molecules that cannabis produces called cannabinoids which are mostly responsible for its effects.  There are over 120 cannabinoids including CBD, THC, CBG, CBC and CBN.

A famous cannabinoid is THC, which is psychoactive and responsible for the high. However, at VitalHemp™ we produce products with a high concentration of the cannabinoid CBD which does not give the high.

The cannabinoids that the cannabis plant produces are very similar to endocannabinoids produced by the human body, and therefore could have huge potential in helping the body to find a balance. However to claim anything, there is a need for large randomized, double blind placebo trials over a very long period of time to be able to prove any positive effects.

Yes, from 250 mg up to 6000mg CBD Cannabidiol.

There are some scientific experiments that indicate that cannabinoids work in a similar way to the endocannabinoids that the human body already produces in healthy people. The mechanisms of action are still not clarified and there are no conclusive studies that show any clear pathways.

The endocannabinoid system is a homeostatic regulator of neuronal activity and almost every other physiological system in the body. It has a regulatory role on pain, inflammation, memory, emotion, sleep and metabolic function.

It comprises a vast network of receptors in the brain, central and peripheral nervous system and cannabis-like compounds called endocannabinoids.

It has been likened to a dimmer switch, constantly working to bring balance when there is too much or too little activity in the body.

Plant cannabinoids like CBD and THC interact with the endocannabinoid system, which researchers believe may explain some of the reported physiological effects of the cannabis plant.

Scientists also believe that when this system isn’t working correctly, disease can occur. This is known as Endocannabinoid Deficiency and could be at the root of many conditions such as migraines, fibromyalgia, IBS and multiple sclerosis.

Recent research has demonstrated that active compounds from other plants species such as Carrot (Daucus carota), kava (Piper methyscum), New Zealand liverwort (Radula marginata), Ginger (Zingiber officinale) and Black pepper (Piper nigrum) contain compounds which interact with the endocannabinoid system.

Cannabinoids are a group of molecules that in general work in a similar way, interacting with the endocannabinoids system. There are some small structural differences, but they all bind to the same receptors in the human body. While there is no evidence as such, there is a lot of speculation in the scientific community that the small structural differences are responsible for the different side effects each individual cannabinoid has.

THC is the cannabinoid that gives its users the ‘high’, and it’s this cannabinoid that is targeted in drug tests. CBD is very similar in structure, however the side effect of CBD is the opposite of THC. Unlike THC, CBD (Cannabidiol) is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid and does not cause a high. In fact, CBD has antipsychotic effects which means CBD works in the complete opposite way to THC.

There are no studies showing the that there are any drug interactions using CBD and other drugs. However it is wise to consult with a professional doctor if one is making dietary changes.

Cannabis oil can be used to describe any cannabis extract.

CBD extract can be used to describe a CBD rich cannabis extract

Hemp extract can be used to describe any cannabis extract. But it doesn’t mean it will be high in CBD as not all hemp plants contain CBD.

We ship worldwide but some countries have import regulations that delay the transportation of hemp based products. We hope that soon all the world will learn about hemp solutions, meanwhile we will notify you immediately if an inspection from your postal service or customs delays your package.

To Greece it takes about 10 days for product to arrive. With express shipping – 2 days.

Norway, Australia, Canada, Iceland, Greenland, New Zealand, Thailand, Russia – please allow about 3-4 weeks additional delivery time because of increased security measures at border crossing points.

Just like pollen from trees, grasses or weeds, marijuana pollen may trigger allergic reactions in a very small minority of people. This subject has not been studied in depth, but there are scientific divs and studies that point to allergic reactions caused by cannabis.
If you choose a product that is GMP certified you minimize the risk of contamination with allergens. VitalHemp™ offers the finest quality cannabis extracts on the market as it is GMP certified. This means that our products contain no hazardous chemicals that can cause an allergic reaction.

Why can cannabis cause allergic reactions?
Cannabis contains over 400 different molecules: Phytocannabinoids, Terpenes, Chlorophyll, Alkanes, Nitrogenous compounds, Amino acids, Sugars, Aldehydes, Alcohols, Ketones, Flavonoids, Glycosides, Vitamins, Pigments and Water.
In rare cases, individuals may be allergic to certain natural compounds. For example, Terpenes are molecules that are in many foods and cosmetics and are known to trigger allergic reactions in a very small percentage of people. However, if you suffer from this rare allergy, it is extremely likely that you will already be aware of it.

Are there many people allergic to cannabis?
From the knowledge available we can conclude that Allergy symptoms have only occasionally been reported as one of the adverse health effects of cannabis use. There has been a call for more controlled studies to determine the mechanisms behind these rare adverse reactions.

Why does cannabis combat allergies and same time provoke allergies?
When cannabis is smoked, the process of heating and burning the herb causes changes to happen to the molecules it contains. These molecules are not normally found in the plant, and in their altered state, they can cause allergic reactions.
In addition, poor indoor growing conditions and the use of pesticides or, the incorrect harvesting and curing of the herbal cannabis that can cause it to become moldy, with toxins created by the mold fungi causing allergic reactions must be taken into account. The spraying of the plant material with chemicals including dangerous artificial cannabinoids or with chemicals designed to increase mass, can cause unpleasant allergic reactions or toxicities.

We treat testing very seriously here at VitalHemp™ and thus spend large amounts of our resources doing quality control. We keep our product safe and free of toxins by controlling our production process in line with Good Manufacturing Process (GMP) regulations. As a result, we are able to guarantee that our cannabis products are free from contaminations. Our product has been successfully used by over 100,000-en people with huge satisfaction.

Good manufacturing practices (GMP) embraces the practices required in order to confirm the guidelines recommended by agencies that control authorization and licensing for manufacture and sale of food, drug products, and active pharmaceutical products. These guidelines provide minimum requirements that a pharmaceutical or a food product manufacturer must meet to assure that the products are of high quality and do not pose any risk to the consumer or public. 

What is the solution?
First of all, use only GMP certified products. Secondly, if you are suffering from e.g. MCS (Multiple Chemical Sensitivity) or in general have a tendency to have allergic reactions you should exercise caution.
Up-titrations are a viable solution. Start with very low doses and increase dosages slowly, monitoring yourself for any indications of an adverse reaction.

Characterization of Cannabis sativa allergens:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/divs/PMC3726218/

Cannabis Allergy: What do We Know Anno 2015:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26178655

Sensitization and allergy to Cannabis sativa leaves in a population of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum)-sensitized patients:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18268387

Selected oxidized fragrance terpenes are common contact allergens:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15932583

Cannabis sativa: the unconventional “weed” allergen:
http://www.annallergy.org/div/S1081-1206%2815%2900035-6/fulltext

Anti-inflammatory activity of topical THC in DNFB-mediated mouse allergic contact dermatitis independent of CB1 and CB2 receptors:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23889474

Cannabinoids as novel anti-inflammatory drugs:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/divs/PMC2828614/

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